I can be open minded

I can listen to people on some topics while disagreeing firmly with them on others.   I came out strong against John Macarthur’s strange fire conference.  Not that I am a charismatic, but I just found the arguments weak.   Still, that is not to denigrate the good work he has done, and I really hope his sloppy arguments there do not backfire and tarnish an otherwise fine ministry.

Here are his talks on Catholicism, which should be interesting.

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Audio dealing with limited atonement

Part of the problem with “refutations of Calvinism” is that said refutations usually focus on how mean it makes God look.   While that is a problem with the doctrine of God, and unhistorical, too, that isn’t really a logical refutation.

Calvinism is a strong, powerful system.   It withstands blows that would fell lesser systems (e.g, dispensationalism).   However, it is susceptible to internal critiques that can function as potent defeaters.      It’s better to deal with problems in Calvinist Christology than debate predestination with a Calvinist.  They live for debating that point.

I am not an Amryauldian.   However, there is a lot of audio distinguishing this system from Calvinism and why they reject Classic Calvinism.   It might be worth your time for these people have stood within the Reformed tradition, and thus their critique, whether they realize it or not, is an internal critique.

Audio here.

Audio on St Athanasius

I am an auditory learner.  I used to spend hundreds of hours on the road traveling.  I had several hundred mp3s on my iPod of just theology and history lectures alone.  So when I first became interested in Orthodoxy and the Church Fathers, I immediately looked up audio lectures on the Saints.   I was dismayed by the dearth of material.  There were a few via Ancient Faith Radio, but even then it was only snippets. Some Reformed seminaries did have substantial audio on these topics, but it was done from a perspective which didn’t understand even the basic points of Patristic theology (as they would likely grudgingly admit).

Fr Raphael Johnson has produced a lot of good talks on many Orthodox saints, to which I will link here. St Athanasius of Alexandria. Towards the end Fr Raphael makes the interesting suggestion that Arius’ god parallels the false god of Freemasonry.  Both are architects but not fully God in the Triune sense.   He should have fleshed it out a bit more but it is an interesting thesis:  both Arianism and Freemasonry can from Egypt.   It would be interesting to tie this in with Pyramidial and Obelisk Religion and the Perennial Philosophy.   Another interesting idea is that the British isles became Arian roughly the same time they became Masonic.