My approach to Eastern Orthodoxy

Unlike many who have “looked into” Orthodoxy and for whatever reason decided not to join, I don’t have an axe to grind with that communion.  For the most part I am quite appreciative.  Further, many of the Protestant critiques of Orthodoxy are quite bad and do more to convince the seeker to join EOdox.

For my own part, my take is simply to relativize a lot of Orthodoxy’s claims and approaches.   The goal is not to show that EO is wrong.   I know I am quite stupid for the most part and in all probability, I am the one in error.   Stupid though I may be, some things I can see clearly.   I am more interested in showing difficulties that warrant justification against joining now.  In other words, in light of the difficulties below (and there are more to follow).  Let’s consider:

1.  Many traditionalist communities (Rome and EO) say we can’t “know” the bible “truly” unless we are part of that communion.  That’s not a far-fetched claim.   If the church “produced” the Bible, then the church, so the argument goes, has the right to interpret the Bible.

Sed contra,

~1.  If that’s the case, why do you quote the bible in apologetics against the non-Orthodox, since they can’t understand it anyway?

2.  People like myself who ask logical questions are accused of importing a Western, rationalistic framework onto theology instead of just “beholding the mystery.”

Sed contra,

~2.   Yet these same people will write very logical and cogent arguments.

3 comments on “My approach to Eastern Orthodoxy

  1. Yokhan says:

    There is a quote that is very true (including for my own conversion / homecoming experience):
    “If you can be something else, then you should not become Orthodox.”

    Fr Daniel, my priest, said that it was spoken by a convert priest or monk in Wales. Sorry I forget his name.

    I like your frankness and conditional “now” 🙂
    IMHO, it’s better to wait or even never to convert if your heart has not come home to the Church (Orthodoxy).

    Personally I hope you will eventually come Home, in God’s beautiful time. However, I wish you all the best, regardless your choice.

    Through the prayers of Panagia Theotokos and all the Saints, may our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ our God have mercy upon us and save us all. Amen.

  2. Andrew Buckingham says:

    “I know I am quite stupid for the most part and in all probability, I am the one in error. Stupid though I may be, some things I can see clearly. I am more interested in showing difficulties that warrant justification against joining now.”

    Jacob,

    You should be careful in your use of the word, “stupid.” I for one don’t think you are. I may be in agreement with my Heavenly Father about this.

    Have you heard the quote, “bloom where you are planted?” It’s a nice quote, I think, for Christians like us and those posting comments on this blog. Let’s not try to work on other people’s own religious convictions. Yes, we can be passionate about our respective tribes. But is God not present, even in those deep places where we must evaluate our own personal relationship in light of the traditions that we find ourselves in? Can we not say that when all the theological discussions become quiet, we are Christians seeking to commune with our Heavenly Father, in the only way we know how (through the one who taught us to pray…Our Father, Which art in Heaven…etc etc.).

    May we all see Jesus more clearly, as we seek to bloom where we are planted.

    Peace.
    AB

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